Recent Publications

Books on Miller (2011–current)   

(Archive 2005-2010)

  • Coming in October: Modern American Drama. Playwriting in the 1940s: Voices, Documents, New Interpretations by Felicia Hardison Londré (New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2017) covers Miller’s 1940s work in detail, while Modern American Drama. Playwriting in the 1950s: Voices, Documents, New Interpretations by Susan C W Abbotson (New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017), more briefly covers Miller’s 50s output.
  • Arthur Miller’s Century: Essays Celebrating the 100th Birthday of America’s Great Playwright. Edited by Stephen Marino. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-4438-8648-2. 18 all new essays by current leading scholars on Miller; covers territory both old (including Crucible and Salesman) and new (including Situation Normal…, Creation, Last Yankee and the collaborations with Inge Morath). An excellent collection that offers assessment of Miller’s stature and continuing relevance at his 100 mark.
  • Anatomy of Innocence: Testimonies of the Wrongfully Convicted, edited by Laura Caldwell and Leslie S. Klinger (New York, N.Y: Liveright Publishing, 2017) contains “Luck and the Death Penalty: Community Involvement: An Essay about Peter Reilly (Connecticut Exoneree)” by Arthur Miller.
  • The Methuen Drama Student Editions of Miller’s plays, approved by the Arthur Miller Estate, have added The Ride Down Mt. Morgan edited by Toby Zinman (2017). Each volume contains the play and in depth notes for that play by a different Miller scholar. Other volumes previously published are: The Crucible, Death of a Salesman, All My Sons, A View from the Bridge, The Price, A Memory of Two Mondays, Broken Glass, After the Fall, and The Last Yankee.
  • Otten, Terry. “Broken Glass: Fifty Years Forward to the Past.” Modern Drama 59.3 (Fall 2016): 327-342. (links the play to Ibsen’s Ghosts)
  • Collected Essays: Arthur Miller (Penguin, 2016), edited by Susan C. W. Abbotson, in which selected essays have been grouped into subject areas that include general discussions of the theater (including tragedy), specific plays, and ones relating to specific socio-political abbotsonessaysconcerns at home and abroad.

  • Joshua Polster’s Stages of Engagement: US Theatre and Performance 1898-1949 (Routledge, 2016) contains extensive discussions of The Crucible and Death of a Salesman.
  • Valerie Barnes Lipscomb’s Performing Age in Modern Drama (New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) contains some discussion of Miller’s plays.
  • Marguerite Chabrol’s De Broadway à Hollywood: Stratégies d’Importation du Théâtre New-Yorkais dans le Cinéma Classique Américain (Paris: CNRS, 2016). Discusses plays by O’Neill, Williams and Miller that have been turned into film. (French)
  • Aziz, Aamir. “Using the Past to Intervene in the Present: Spectacular Framing in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible.” New Theatre Quarterly 32.2 (May 2016): 169-180.
  • Arthur Miller’s student play No Villain is available in print (London: Josef Weinberger, 2016).
  • Henry Bial’s Playing God: The Bible of the Broadway Stage (Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2015). Contains discussion of The Creation of the World and Other Business, and offers an interesting assessment of why the play was so poorly received.
  • Dorothy Chansky’s Kitchen Sink Realisms: Domestic Labor, Dining, and Drama in American Theatre (University of Iowa Press, 2015). As part of their Studies in Theatre History and Culture series. Includes discussion of Death of a Salesman.
  • Two new juvenile guides: Amy Dunkleberger’s Reading and interpreting the works of Arthur Miller (New York, NY: Enslow Publishing, 2016), and Catherine Reef’s Arthur Miller (Greensboro, North Carolina: Morgan Reynolds Publishing, 2015). This has the following chapters: Changing fortunes –A new shadow –Wanting something more –The artist’s soul –A tragedy set in Brooklyn –Common vengeance –The lowest point –“Flesh of the playwright’s flesh” –One humanity –Miller’s gift.
  • In 2015, Dover reprinted in paperback the long out of print children’s book that Miller wrote in 1963: Jane’s Blanket. They include the original Al Parker illustrations. (In 1972 the original was reissued with new illustrations by Emily McCully.)
  • Edited by Miriam López-Rodríguez, Inmaculada Pineda-Hernández and Alfonso Ceballos Muñoz, Old Stories, New Readings: The Transforming Power of American Drama (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015), contains an essay by Christiane Desafy-Grignard titled: “Arthur Miller’s Plays Seen from a Feminist Perspective: Was Miller Sexist?”
  •  Allan H Ryskind’s Hollywood Traitors: Blacklisted Screenwriters: Agents of Stalin, Allies of Hitler (Washington, DC : Regnery History, 2015), contains the chapter: “Arthur Miller: Was He or Wasn’t He?”
  • Woman on Trial: Gender and the Accused Woman in Plays from Ancient Greece to the Contemporary Stage, edited by Amelia Howe Kritzer and Miriam López-Rodríguez (Amherst, New York: Teneo Press, 2015), contains Amelia Howe Kritzer’s essay: “Witchcraft Trials in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible and Caryl Churchill’s Vinegar Tom.”
  • Two guides in German for Miller’s best known plays by Dorothée Leidig: Textanalyse und Interpretation zu Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, (Hollfeld: Bange, 2015), pp. 111, and Textanalyse und Interpretation zu Arthur Miller, The Crucible, pp. 109 (Hollfeld: Bange, 2016), pp.111.
  • Kumar, Dey Anup, Quest for Identity in Arthur Miller’s Plays. Scholar’s Press, 2015.
  • Whose reality? by Lewis Mitchell and Olivia Jamieson. Study notes and a workshop approach to Michael Leunig’s The Lot: In Words, Barry Levinson’s Wag the Dog, J.M. Coetzee’s Foe, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. 2015.
  • nottageA new Centennial edition of Arthur Miller’s Collected Plays edited by Lynn Nottage, from Penguin, October 2015. Contains 18 major full-length plays from The Man Who Had All the Luck to Resurrection Blues. Paperback. Penguin have also reissued most of Miller’s plays in single volumes with newly designed covers.
  • Emily Bosco’s The Crucible. Student Book (Strathfield: Into English, 2015).
  • Arthur Miller features in Peter Dreier’s The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame (Nation Books, 2012). In honor of the centenary, Huffington Post printed his commentary on Miller (while sympathetic to Miller, not all of the details given are entirely accurate).roudane
  • Matthew Roudané has edited The Collected Essays of Arthur Miller London: Bloomsbury Methuen, 2015 (an amalgamation of all of the essays from Theater Essays and Echoes Down the Corridor organized chronologically with a new introduction).
  • Marlene Wagman-Geller’s Behind Every Great Man: The Forgotten Women Behind the World’s Famous and Infamous (Naperville, Illinois: Sourcebooks, 2015) covers Miller’s depiction of Marilyn in After the Fall.
  • A new edition of Miller’s Death of a Salesman in Beijing: Arthur Miller, edited with an introduction by Claire Conceison for Bloomsbury in London, 2015.
  • Toby Zinman’s Replay: Classic Modern Drama Reimagined (New York : Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2015) looks at different stage versions of Salesman.
  • Palmer, David. “Three Ways to Fail at Forgiveness: Beckett, Miller, and O’Neill.” Eugene O’Neill Review 36.2 (2015): 115-149.
  • Woo, Miseong. “The Antiheroic Protagonists in Modern Drama: Leo Tolstoy’s Influence on Arthur Miller.” Journal of Modern English Drama, 28.2 (Aug. 2015): 165-194.
  • Collins, Holly. “Towards a ‘Brave New World’: Tracing the Emergence of Creolization in Maryse Condé’s Canonical Rewritings.” Women in French Studies 23 (2015): 69-84.
  • John Lahr’s Joy Ride: Show People and their Shows (New York: W.W. Norton, 2015) includes comments on Miller.
  • Quinlan, Kieran. “Being Willy Loman” Chronicle of Higher Education 29 (May 2015): 61
  • Caplan, Debra. “’Attention Must Be Paid’: Death of a Salesman‘s Counter-Adapted Yiddish Homecoming.” Modern Drama 58.2 (Summer 2015): 194-217. (discusses the 1951 Yiddish production by Buloff in depth)
  • David Patterson’s Anti-Semitism and its Metaphysical Origins (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2015) has a chapter: “Sounding the Depths of the Anti-Semitic Soul: Arthur Miller’s Focus.
  • The third volume of the Library of America series edited by Tony Kushner: Arthur Miller: Collected Plays 1987-2004: (Library of America #261) from April 2015: from Danger: Memory (1987) to Finishing the Picture (2004). It includes The Ride Down Mt. Morgan, The Last Yankee, Broken Glass, Mr. Peters’ Connections, and Resurrection Blues. Also The Golden Years, several shorter one-act plays and never-before-published early works and radio plays; and a selection of Miller’s prose reflections on his art, including: “On Screenwriting and Language” and “About Theatre Language.”  Hardback. You can now also buy the three volume set.marino
  • Stephen Marino, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman / The Crucible: A Reader’s Guide to Essential Criticism, Macmillan/Palgrave, 2015. An invaluable guide to past and current scholarship on these two seminal plays.
  • Denis Jonnes’ Cold War American Literature and the Rise of Youth Culture: Children of Empire (New York; London: Taylor & Francis, 2014) has a chapter: “Generation on Trial: Arthur Miller’s Theater of Judgment.”
  • Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013), contains a chapter on Miller.
  • Andrew Sofer. Dark Matter: Invisibility in Drama, Theatre and Performance. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 2013, has a full chapter on Miller (chapter 5), concentrating on The Archbishop’s Ceiling, mapping the changes in Miller’s philosophy from Ibsenian morality (in After the Fall) to Foucaultian issues of power in the later play.
  • Kevin Riordan, “Salesman in Abu Dhabi: The Geopathology of Objects.” Modern Drama 57.3 (2014): 409-32. Interesting article that analyzes a production of Salesman in which certain characters are replaced by inanimate objects, such as Charlie by a rolling refrigerator door; The Woman, a table fan; and Happy a black punching bag on a movable frame!
  • The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary American Playwrights, edited by Martin Middeke, Peter Paul Schnierer, and Christopher Innes (New York : Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2014), contains a chapter on “Arthur Miller” written by Susan C. W. Abbotson.
  • 吾文泉. “阿瑟·密勒戏剧的犹太写作” (Arthur Miller Plays Jewish Writing) Foreign Literature Studies/Wai Guo Wen Xue Yan Jiu, 36.2 (Apr. 2014): 66-72 (about Miller’s treatment of Jewish identity)
  • Richard Eyre’s What do I know?: People, Politics and the ArtsLondon : Nick Hern Books, 2014). Includes Arthur Miller recounting to Eyre the events of the first night of Death of a Salesman.
  • Robert J Andreach’s Tragedy in the Contemporary American Theatre (Lanham, MD; Toronto; Plymouth, UK: University Press of America, 2014). This book examines plays by contemporary playwrights and compares them alongside the works of Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams. Andreach argues that tragedy is not only present in contemporary American theatre, but issues from an expectation fundamental to American culture: the pressure on characters to create themselves.
  • Is It ‘Cause It’s Cool? Affective Encounters with American Culture, edited by Astrid M. Fellner, Susanne Hamscha, Klaus Heissenberger, and Jennifer J. Moos (Vienna, Austria: LIT; 2014). Contains the essay: “Emotional Capitalism, Transnationalism, and the Survival of a Salesman” by Leopold Lippert, pp. 255-71.
  • The Oxford Handbook of American Drama, edited by Jeffrey H. Richards and Heather S. Nathans (New York : Oxford University Press, 2014) contains an essay by Jeffrey D. Mason: “Arthur Miller: A Radical Politics of the Soul.”
  • Devers, Rebecca. “’You Don’t Prepare Breakfast … You Launch It Like a Missile’: The Cold War Kitchen and Technology’s Displacement of the Home.” Americana: The Journal of American Popular Culture (1900-Present) 13.1 (1 March , 2014). Focused on Salesman.
  • Ramon Espejo Romero’s Re-thinking Critical Paradigms on Arthur Miller: Resurrection Blues and the Postmodern (London : Goldsmiths University of London, 2014). Goldsmiths Performance Research pamphlets.
  • Donald Dewey’s Lee J. Cobb. The Life of an Actor (Blue Ridge Summit : Scarecrow Press, 2014), has a chapter on his portrayal of Willy as well as a picture of this landmark role on the book’s cover.
  • Edward W. Younkins’ Exploring Capitalist Fiction: Business through Literature and Film (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014), contains a chapter: “Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman: A Case of Self-Delusion.”
  • Yoon, Hee-uhk. “A Study of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons through Levinas’s Philosophy of Otherness: The Violence of the Same and the Forgetting of the Other.” Journal of Modern English Drama 27.3 (Dec. 2014): 279-302.
  • Roszak, Suzanne. “Salem Rewritten Again: Arthur Miller, Maryse Condé, and Appropriating the Bildungsroman.” Comparative Literature 66.1 (Winter 2014): 113-126.
  • Leonard Orr’s Holocaust Literature An Introduction (Continuum Publishing Corporation, 2014), contains discussion of Miller pieces.
  • Clapp, Jeffrey. “From Signing to Strangling: Arthur Miller and the National Security State.” Textual Practice 28.3 (May 2014): 365-384. (discusses Crucible and After the Fall).
  • Kolt, Robert. “The Devil Made Me Do It! History to Play to Opera: Media Transformation in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible.” Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies 20.1 (Spring 2014): 55-76.
  • Samantaray, Swati. “Dystopia: A Critique of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman.” New Academia: An International Journal of English Language Literature and Literary Theory 3.1 (Jan. 2014): 1-5.
  • Michael Spindler’s 1983 book from Indiana UP, American Literature and Social Change: William Dean Howells to Arthur Miller, has been reprinted by Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.
  • Aiello, Francisco. “Moi, Tituba de Maryse Condé: Reescribir la Literatura de los Hombres.” Celehis: Revista del Centro de Letras Hispanoamericanas 28 (2014): 11-29. (touches on The Crucible)
  • Richard D. Meyer. Making the Fall. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. With the permission of Kazan, Meyer spent a sabbatical recording what went on during the first year of the Lincoln Repertory Theater. Included are verbatim conversations between Miller, Kazan, and the cast of their first production: After the Fall. The book also includes never-before-published excerpts from Kazan’s personal notes and letters.
  • Intertextuality in American Drama: Critical Essays on Eugene O’Neill, Susan Glaspell, Thonton Wilder, Arthur Miller and Other Playwrights. Eds. Drew Eisenhauer and Brenda Murphy. North Carolina and London: MacFarland, 2013. Contains two new essays on Miller.bratercollmethuen
  • A Student Handbook to the Plays of Arthur Miller: All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, Broken Glass. Ed. Enoch Brater. London: Methuen, Nov. 2013 This contains notes created for the title plays by an assortment of leading Miller scholars, but not the plays themselves.
  • Timebends: A Life.  Miller’s wonderful 1978 autobiography was reissued by Grove Press in 2013 as both a paperback and in a Kindle edition.
  • Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2013), contains a chapter on Miller.
  • Barry Paris, ed. Stella Adler On America’s Master Playwrights. New York: Vintage, 2012. Contains two chapters on Miller: Death of a Salesman (325-337) and After the Fall (338-356).